Bibliography

This post contains selected relevant publications and materials related to the Sustaining Digital History initiative.  Several documents on the list below are available online and have direct links following the citation.  Please feel free to send suggestions for additions.

  1. Anderson, Deborah Lines, ed.  Digital Scholarship in the Tenure, Promotion, and Review Process.  London:  M.E. Sharpe, 2004.
  2. Ayers, Edward L. “Doing Scholarship on the Web:  Ten Years of Triumphs – and a Disappointment.” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 35 (April 2004):  143-147.
  3. Ayers, Edward L., “History in Hypertext,” 1999. Available at         http://www.vcdh.virginia.edu/Ayers.OAH.html (accessed September 24, 2010).
  4. Bartlett, Rebecca Ann and Carolyn Wilcox. “At ‘Choice,’ Digital Scholarship Gets Respect.” Chronicle of Higher Education (July 4, 2010).  Available at http://chronicle.com/article/At-Choice-Digital-Schola/66139/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  5. Ballor, Jordan J.  “Scholarship at the Crossroads:  The Journal of Markets & Morality Case Study.”  Journal of Scholarly Publishing 36 (April 2005):  145-165.
  6. Borgman, Christine L. Scholarship in the Digital Age:  Information, Infrastructure, and the Internet.  Cambridge, MA:  The MIT Press, 2007.
  7. Center for Digital Research in the Humanities, University of Nebraska – Lincoln, “Promotion &   Tenure Criteria for Assessing Digital Research in the Humanities,” (2008). Available at             http://cdrh.unl.edu/articles/promotion_and_tenure.php (accessed September 24, 2010).
  8. Cheverie, Joan F., et. al. “Digital Scholarship in the University Tenure and Promotion Process: A Report on the Sixth Scholarly Communication Symposium.” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 40 (April 2009):  219-230.
  9. Cohen, Daniel J. “History and the Second Decade of the Web.” Rethinking History 8 (June 2004):  293-301. Available at http://chnm.gmu.edu/essays-on-history-new-media/essays/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  10. Cohen, Daniel J., et. al. “Interchange:  The Promise of Digital History.”  Journal of American History (September 2008):  452-491.
  11. Cohen, Patricia. “Scholars Test Web Alternative to Peer Review.”  New York Times (August 23, 2010). Available at http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/arts/24peer.html? r=1 (accessed 24 September 2010).
  12. Coulter, Gerry.  “Launching (and Sustaining) a Scholarly Journal on the Internet:  The International Journal of Baudrillard Studies.” Journal of Electronic Publishing 13 (Winter 2010).
  13. Crow, Raym.  “Income Models for Open Access:  An Overview of Current Practice.”  SPARC,   September 2009.  Available at http://www.arl.org/sparc (accessed September 24, 2010).
  14. Dalton, Margaret Stieg. “The Publishing Experiences of Historians.” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 39 (April 2008):  197-240.
  15. Davidson, Cathy N. “The Futures of Scholarly Publishing.”  Journal of Scholarly Publishing 35 (April 2004):  129-142.
  16. English, James F. “Scholarly Journals in the Digital Age:  Old Versus New Forms of Inquiry.” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 37 (October 2005):  8-18.
  17. Fitzpatrick, Kathleen. “Peer-to-Peer Review and the Future of Scholarly Authority.”  Cinema Journal 48 (Winter 2009):  124-129.
  18. Friedberg, Anne.  “On Digital Scholarship.” Cinema Journal 48 (Winter 2009): 150-154.
  19. Gould, Thomas H.P. “Scholar as E-Publisher: The Future Role of [Anonymous] Peer Review within Online Publishing.” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 41 (July 2010):  428-448.
  20. Guthrie, Kevin, et. al. “Sustainability and Revenue Models for Online Academic Resources:  An Ithaka Report.” Strategic Content Alliance and Ithaka, May 2008.
  21. Hahn, Karla L. “Talk About Talking About New Models of Scholarly Communication.” Journal of Electronic Publishing 11 (Winter 2008). Available at http://www.journalofelectronicpublishing.org/browse.html (accessed September 24, 2010).
  22. Harley, Diane, et. al., “Assessing the Future Landscape of Scholarly Communication:  An Exploration of Faculty Values and Needs in Seven Disciplines,” report produced by the Center for Studies in Higher Education, UC Berkeley, 01/01/2010. Available at  http://escholarship.org/uc/cshe_fsc (accessed September 24, 2010).
  23. Howard, Jennifer. “Humanities Journals Confront Identity Crisis.” Chronicle of Higher Education (March 27, 2009).
  24. Howard, Jennifer. “Leading Humanities Journal Debuts ‘Open’ Peer Review, and Likes It.” Chronicle of Higher Education (July 26, 2010).
  25. Howard, Jennifer. “Scholars Increasingly Embrace Some, but Not All, Digital Media.” Chronicle of Higher Education (April 7, 2010).
  26. Howard, Jennifer.  “When Scholars Weigh Publication Options, Tradition Counts.” Chronicle of Higher Education (January 31, 2010). Available at http://chronicle.com/article/When- Scholars-Weigh-Publica/63826/ (accessed Sept 24, 2010).
  27. Katz, Stan. “Publishing and University Prestige.” The Chronicle of Higher Education –  Brainstorm (May 23, 2010).  Available at     http://chronicle.com/blogPost/PublishingUniversity-P/24217/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  28. Katz, Stan.  “Reviewing Digital Scholarship.” Chronicle of Higher Education (May 31, 2010).
  29. Leonard, Andrew. “Can history survive Silicon Valley?:  Stanford University archivists struggle to preserve the past of a place that cares only for the future.” Salon online (June 10, 1999).  Available at http://www.salon.com/technology/feature/1999/06/10/stanford (accessed September 24, 2010).
  30. Lewis, Anthony, et. al. “Google & the Future of Books:  An Exchange.” The New York Review of Books (January 14, 2010). Available at http://www.nybook.com/articles/archives/2010/jan/14/google-the-future-of-books-an-exchange/? page=1 (accessed September 24, 2010).
  31. Maron, Nancy L. and K. Kirby Smith, “Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication: Results of an Investigation Conducted by Ithaka Strategic Services for the Association of Research Libraries.” Journal of Electronic Publishing 12 (February 2009).
  32. Martin, Shawn. “The ‘Marriage’ of Technology and History.” Journal of the Association for History and Computing 13 (Spring 2010).
  33. McGann, Jerome.  “The Future is Digital.”  Journal of Victorian Culture 13 (Spring 2008):  80-88.
  34. Park, Ji-Hong. “Motivations for Web-Based Scholarly Publishing:  Do Scientists Recognize Open Availability as an Advantage?” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 40 (July 2009): 343-369.
  35. Park, Ji-Hong. “The Relationship between Scholarly Communication and Science and Technology Studies (STS).” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 39 (April 2008): 257-273.
  36. Price, Kenneth M. and Katherine L. Walter.  “With Help, Digital Scholarship is Likely to Dominate in Coming Years.” Chronicle of Higher Education (July 4 2010).  Available from http://chronicle.com/article/With-Help-Digital-Scholarship/66137 (accessed September 24, 2010).
  37. Raben, Joshua. “Tenure, Promotion and Digital Publication.” Digital Humanities Quarterly 1 (Spring 2007).  Available at     http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/001/1/000006/000006.html (accessed September 24, 2010).
  38. Robertson, Stephen. “Doing History in Hypertext.” Journal of the Association for History and Computing 7 (August 2004). Available at    http://mcel.pacificu.edu/jahc/2004/issue2/articles/robertson.php (accessed September 24, 2010).
  39. Rosenzweig, Roy.  “Can History be Open Source?  Wikipedia and the Future of the Past.” Journal of American History 93 (June 2006):  117-146. Available at http://chnm.gmu.edu/essays-on-history-new-media/essays/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  40. Rumsey, Abby Smith. “Scholarly Communication Institute 8: Emerging Genres in Scholarly Communication.” Scholarly Communication Institute, University of Virginia Library, July 14-16, 2010. Available at http://www.uvasci.org/current-institute/sci-8-report/ (accessed September 29, 2010).
  41. Seefeldt, Douglas and William G. Thomas. “What is Digital History?:  A Look at Some Exemplar Projects.”  AHA Perspectives (May 2009).  Available at          http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2009/0905/0905for8.cfm (accessed September 24, 2010).
  42. Smith, Abby. “New-Model Scholarship: Destined for the Dustbin of History” AHA Perspectives (October 2003).  Available at     http://www.historians.org/Perspectives/issues/2003/0310/0310vie1.cfm (accessed September 24, 2010).
  43. Smith, Abby. New-Model Scholarship:  How Will it Survive? Council on Library and Information Resources, March 2003.  Available at       http://www.clir.org/pubs/reports/pub114/contents.html (accessed September 24, 2010).
  44. Smith, Abby.  “Valuing Preservation.” Library Trends 56 (Summer 2007):  4-25.
  45. Smith, Carl. “Can You Do Serious History on the Web?” AHA Perspectives (February 1998). Available at http://chnm.gmu.edu/essays-on-history-new-media/essays/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  46. Smulyan, Susan. “Everyone a Reviewer? Problems and Possibilities in Hypertext Scholarship.” American Quarterly 51 (June 1999): 263-267.
  47. Snyder, Kerala J. “Electronic Journals and the Future of Scholarly Communication A Case Study.” Notes 58 (September 2001):  34-38.
  48. Staley, David J. “Designing and Displaying Historical Information in the Electronic Age.” Journal of the Association for History and Computing 1 (June 1998).  Available at http://mcel.pacificu.edu/jahc/1998/issue1/articles/staley/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  49. Staley, David J. Computers, Visualization, and History:  How New Technology Will Transform Our Understanding of the Past.  London:  M.E. Sharpe, 2003.
  50. Stanford University Libraries (SULAIR), “Scholarly Communication and Publishing Issues,” last modified July 28, 2009.  Available at http://www-sul.stanford.edu/scholarly_com/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  51. Thomas, William G. “Writing a Digital History Journal Article from Scratch:  An Account.” Digital History (December 2007).  Available at http://digitalhistory.unl.edu/essays/thomasessay.html (accessed September 24, 2010).
  52. Thurston, Thomas. “New Questions for New Media:  Scholarly Writing and Online Publishing.” American Quarterly 51 (June 1999): 250-253.
  53. Townsend, Robert B. “All of Tomorrow’s Yesterdays: History Scholarship on the Web.” AHA Perspectives (May 2002). Available at http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2002/0205/0205pub3.cfm (accessed October 5, 2010).
  54. Townsend, Robert B. “History and the Future of Scholarly Publishing.” AHA Perspectives (October 2003). Available at http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2003/0310/0310vie3.htm (Accessed October 5, 2010).
  55. Townsend, Robert B. “Is there a Future for Journals in the Humanities?” AHA Today (August 31, 2009).  Available at http://blog.historians.org/artices/865/is-there-a-future-for-journals-in-the-humanities (accessed September 24, 2010).
  56. Waltham, Mary. The Future of Scholarly Journals Publishing Among Social Science and   Humanities Associations.  Report on a study funded by a Planning Grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, February 2009.  Available at http://www.nhalliance.org/bm~doc/hssreport.pdf (accessed September 24, 2010).
  57. Wittenberg, Kate.  “Beyond Google: What Next for Publishing?” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 38 (October 2006): 31-35.
  58. Wittenberg, Kate. “Digital Technology and Historical Scholarship:  A Publishing Perspective.” AHA Perspectives (May 2002). Available at http://www.historians.org/perspectives/issues/2002/0205/0205pub4.cfm (accessed September 24, 2010).
  59. Wittenberg, Kate.  “Scholarly Editing in the Digital Age.”  Chronicle Review (June 20, 2003). Available at http://chronicle.com/article/Scholarly-Editing-in-the-Di/18724/ (accessed September 24, 2010).
  60. Xia, Jingfeng. “Electronic Publishing in Archaeology.” Journal of Scholarly Publishing 37 (July 2006):  270-287.
  61. Young, Jeffrey R. “With Digital Maps, Historians Chart a New Way Into the Past.” Chronicle of Higher Education (November 10, 2006).
  62. Young, Jeffrey R. “Crowd Science Reaches New Heights.” Chronicle of Higher Education (May 28, 2010).
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